Role-Playing Games and Leveling Up – Day 2

It’s almost midnight.

Gotta get this post done before tomorrow.
So I can write one for tomorrow too.

 

Let’s pick up where we left off! Yesterday, I finished off by detailing some decisions the player could make regarding his character. He’s only five and hasn’t used a bow before. He knows how they work, of course, but it’s going to take some practice to get going. So, the player heads out to the back yard and starts looking from something to shoot. Maybe there’s a scare crow to serve as a target for them. We can make the young character’s learning experience a bit more novel, show him struggling to get the basics of using the bow the first few times.
Maybe he isn’t strong enough and can’t get the string drawn enough to propel the arrow to the target, or he’s unsteady and can’t aim well. Whatever the case, we can start the player’s understanding of their character here to give a broader contrast to how he will be after he has developed more. Use of a very heavy shift between two extremes in the game can give a sharp contrast and help to make the player feel more accomplished, like they actually did something.

So, the young boy is almost a mighty warrior, right? He’s getting there, for sure. Yesterday, I mentioned using events that are less-than-desirable to create a more memorable experience for the player. I demonstrated the smaller end of that spectrum, but I think we can touch on the very opposite of it today.

Let’s fast forward a bit. The player is a few hours into the game and his character has aged a few years, to represent the amount of learning and work the player has put in. One day, game-father asks the player’s character if he’d like to learn how to hunt. Heading out into the woods, game-dad starts talking about animal tracks and spoor, showing the player how to spot these things on the ground. To support this, animals would leave tracks and other markings behind. Supporting this character’s instruction with actual mechanics will go a long ways to tying the whole experience together.

While he’s showing you about the tracks, you hear a scream from the farm house! Game-dad takes off for the house, leaving the player alone. For the sake of my sleepiness, I’ll cover only the circumstance of following game-pa. He’s got a head-start, but as you come to the edge of the woods by the house, the player is given glimpses of the soldiers and has been able to see smoke overhead. As you get closer, you can hear the fire crackling and the soldiers talking. If the player breaks out into the yard, he’ll probably be killed. If the player doesn’t think so and tries it, they’ll find out quickly that the game isn’t going to hold back because of poor decision making.

So, they have a few options. They can evade the troops, try to sneak into the house. When they go inside, they find their game-dad and game-mom laying on the deck. Game-mother is already dead and game-daddy is bleeding out from a nasty looking stab wound. There’s a soldier at the opposite end of the room, watching out the window. The player can choose to kill him or to just lay low, with experience granted the respective skill sets, without notifying the player, just like before.

If they approach game-dad, he tries to talk, but only coughs up blood, rather loudly. The guard in the room, if not dead, turns around and sees the player, but hesitates. We can always tie him into later game events by giving him an identifying feature: a scar, an eye patch, something to that effect. But for now, we’ll just assume that he doesn’t really want to kill a little kid. He motions for you to run away. Game-dad’s larger-than-your bow is on the table and his knife. The player isn’t told to grab them, but they can if they think to.

The player isn’t explicitly told to run away, they can still draw their bow at him, which would force him to attack you. So, let’s assume the player runs out and heads for the little shelter the family horse is under, dozing off. Assuming the player had learned how to ride the horse in those couple of in-game years we so conveniently skipped over at the beginning of this post, they can take the horse and ride in the direction of town.

I’ll probably come back to this tomorrow and remember why I don’t write when I’m tired, but oh well.
Take it or leave it.
You’ll get something better after I sleep.

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2 thoughts on “Role-Playing Games and Leveling Up – Day 2

  1. Anthony says:

    Im reading both of these and I think you have a great Idea of a new game. If you were to make something like this I would certainly pay for it. Keep up the idea making. You could be the next number 1 game designer of the world.

    • Shayne B. says:

      Thanks, I appreciate the support a lot. I’m really wanting to get back to Marpeg and my text-based work now that I have a little free time.

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